What Is The Bandwagon Effect?

It’s a natural tendency for humans to copy one another, even without realizing it — we like to be a part of tribes and social communities. So when we notice our social circle is doing one thing, we tend to follow suit. One great way to make an offer more valuable is to show that other people are participating in that offer.

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In other words, this bandwagon effect shows trends in consumer behavior. The bandwagon effect goes all the way back to the 19th century where Dan Rice traveled the country while campaigning for President Zachary Taylor. Dan encouraged those to “jump on the bandwagon” and support Presidential Candidate Zachary. Their campaign turned out quite successful as Taylor was elected President! By the 20th century, this was

Proof in Numbers
When possible, an excellent way to indicate how impressive an offer is to mention the number of people who have purchased, downloaded, signed
up, or donated.

Some examples include:

  • Webinars:On this page promoting our webinar with Facebook, we’ve stated that more than 40,000 have signed up.
  • Blog Subscription: Similarly, on our blog under our “subscribe” module, it indicates over 130,000 people have subscribed. This is proof that it’s a highly trustworthy and favorite blog people should follow.
  • Conferences: Events like SXSW and INBOUND are some of the hottest events because tons of people flock to them every year.

Just make sure your claims are not only true but believable. Keep in mind clear content trumps persuasion! Be clear in your message and what you want from someone, as opposed to only using numbers to get someone’s attention and hope they follow.

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